The Duruflé Trio Sunday 17th June 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our next concert, The Duruflé Trio play new music from New Music Brighton composers, C P E Bach, Arnold Bax
& William Alwyn

Terence Allbright | Interlude
William Alwyn | Flute and Piano Sonata
CPE Bach | Trio in A minor
Phil Baker | An Epiphany of Silence – Prelude
Arnold Bax | Legend for Viola and Piano
J C Clark | Trio brevissimo
Ric Graebner | Sphygmomania 111-76
Patrick Harrex | Invention – confused canon
John Hawkins | Romantique
John Petley | Pastorale from Sonata for flute and piano
Guy Richardson | Quest

Rosie Bowker flute
Henrietta Hill viola
Clare Simmonds piano

Tickets available online here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/durufle-trio-tickets-46317622255?aff=utm_source=eb_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_term=eventurl_text

£10| £6

Tickets also available on the door.

Sun 17 June 2018 17:00 
St Luke’s Church, Queen’s Park Road. Brighton, BN2 9ZB

The Riot Ensemble 2017

AYRE

Date: Saturday 28th October 2017, 5.00pm
Venue: St. Nicholas Church, Brighton (BN1 3LJ)

Now in it’s fourth year, our annual concert with the New Music Brighton composer collective sees us perform an array of their miniatures alongside the UK premiere of Chaya Czernowin’s Ayre: Towed through plumes, thicket, asphalt, sawdust and hazardous air I shall not forget the sound ofalongside two of our call for scores commissions (Mirela Ivicevic and Sylvain Marty)
After the music, join us for food and drinks at the our afterparty at a nearby pub!

…celebrating Sussex Folk Song in new ways

New Music Brighton in collaboration with Horsham Folk Club with funding from The Chalk Cliff Fund proudly present two concerts of music for eight part choir 3 folk singers with flute and violin on October 21st in Alfriston and November 11th, 2017 in Uckfield

The concert events include performances from members Horsham Folk Club representing a collaboration of traditional musicians and composers from classical backgrounds.

Eight new compositions and arrangements by NMB composers Phil Baker, Julian Broughton, Ric Graebner, Patrick Harrex, John Hawkins, Barry Mills, Guy Richardson and Clive Whitburn are based on Sussex folk music and literature, and will be performed by an eight voice choir either a cappella or with traditional instruments. The conductor for the performances will be Julian Broughton.

Folksong and you: workshop for all (free) 3.30
Horsham Folk Band in venue from 6:45
Concert: 7:30

St Luke’s Music & Wine, New Music Brighton Concert January 13th 2017, a review by Simon Jenner

It’s hard to overestimate this composers’ collective, the UK’s biggest, even harder to compress justice to five premieres. The Ireland Trio – Ellie Blackshaw (violin), Peter Copley (cello) Adam Swayne (piano) – struck and trilled their way through seven Piano Trios; six of the composers were present, two playing.

James Shenton’s Nightmusic is a Gershwin-minimalist-inspired study in rippling sweeps and chord sequences, a sourbet to Patrick Harrex’s masterly piano violin & cello. Harrex is the most established voice; acceleration starting off in stark Morton Feldman pings rise to a moto perpetuo, with exhilarating menaces.

Jonathan Clark’s attractive Three Short Pieces enfold two hymns (one’s called ‘Song’) hypnotically round a striding ‘Scherzo’. The last ‘Hymn’ evokes the spare opening to Britten’s Canticle II crossed with Part’s glassy-violin Fratres.

Peter Copley’s Piano Trio No. 2 is huge, so just the third movement, a fantastic passacaglia – variations on a bass turned backwards half-way here in a palindrome – was played. Spellbinding to the audience, Swayne’s emphatic pointing-up was raptly paused.

Guy Richardson’s knotty Trio boasts melodic drift sashayed between cluster harmonies and Swayne literally knocking on piano wood as Copley’s expressive cello melodies were taken up by Swayne; then a wash of Richardson impressionism. It shifts his profile.

Ellie Blackshaw’s Trio in F sharp happily isn’t as brief as she claims: serially-kerned, gestural, wistful, in ternary form it needs grasping twice – Blackshaw’s violin superb here.

John Ireland’s own 1938 Trio No. 3 in E washes impressionism with English modality through gamuts of moods, a yammering non-folk scherzo to wonderful drooping slow movement figures: the heart of this shifting work, it’s not obliterated by the finale echoing Ireland’s fine piano ‘Chelsea Reach’.

This is really Festival quality; many braved the ice for it.

Simon Jenner